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(@gordon-clarry)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 21
25/09/2020 1:10 am  

@nyterm - beautiful.  But I must admit the first thing I noticed was the track work!  Very impressive on both counts!

Gord


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(@nyterm)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
28/09/2020 7:21 pm  

As anyone looking at my photos would surmise, I model B&O.  Here is something different - a PRR passenger car!  A fellow member of our NMRA Division gave me a partially assembled O scale Walthers observation. It's a four-compartment/lounge. Pullman built about 28 of them in 1925/6.  Nearly all of them were named for  Revolutionary and early republic buildings in the northeast. The PRR and the New Haven were assigned many of them, for heavy Boston-Washington DC traffic. B&O did not have  them, as my friend hoped it would be finished as a B&O car. I chose the name "Federal Hall" which is in NY City. That car was among the Pullmans the PRR bought and operated after the Pullman Company divested. "Federal Hall' was one of the last open platform observations PRR ran and it was converted to a coach in 1948. But here is how it looked before that final make-over.  It's detailed for ice- activated air conditioning which PRR favored. It has interior detail that includes a photo of Federal Hall on the wall over the stenographers desk, LED lighting, a porter and some passengers.  


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(@orangeempire)
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Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 35
28/09/2020 7:57 pm  

Well done!

I'm motivated to do a similar project for my Railway (Santa Fe or Southern Pacific)

Juerg

Orange Empire


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(@nyterm)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
29/09/2020 7:05 pm  

Steam power was still being run when I became a teen.  NY Central still ran its Niagara 4-8-4's along the eastern Hudson River shore, Jersey Central ran its 4-6-0 and other camelbacks in passenger and freight service and PRR was running their K4s locos on the New York and Long Branch out of South Amboy NJ.  But B&O, Staten Island and Reading steam left the scene by 1948.

Well, on my Baltimore and New York, steam power held on for a longer period. In this scene a B&O Q-4b is at the point of an eastbound Metropolitan Limited. It was B&O's 'maid of all work' between St. Louis and Jersey City, making just about every stop along the way. There were times when B&O put a Q up front as substitute passenger power, so why not here?  Edgewater, next stop!  


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(@nyterm)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
30/09/2020 10:00 pm  

Overhead photos of model railroads are not all that well accepted, being that we try to cerate a realistic, believable scene and ought to be seen at eye level.

But often some detail is lost that way.

In this scene, a hopper load of anthracite is delivered at a dealer's yard as a B&O RDC-2 "Speed Liner" rolls by on the westbound main line.


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(@nyterm)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
03/10/2020 9:48 pm  

Street scenes help to make a model railroad look complete. It need not be elaborate. On my layout there is a small extension in he benchwork holding a pier for the crossing an aisle to another part of the layout.  I made it as a triangular shape, almost 3' along side the Edgewater Yard and about a foot for the two track bridge pier.  I put in "Shore Road" typically narrow Staten Island sort of street and in it a trolley track. It sort of mimics Bay Street at Clifton on Staten Island but is shrunk down.

A building stands beside the embankment for the bridge tracks. A deck plate girder bridge goes over the street. Through plate girders carry the line over the west end of Edgewater Yard. Traffic is busy on Shore Road.  A Philadelphia Transit PCC on Route 23 - Germantown Avenue makes a stop. 

Yes, out of place for a Staten Island scene. But when I was studying for my masters degree in Philadelphia in the mid-1960's, I was a frequent rider of car 23. It had the longest run of any in the city, From the far northwest corner at the city line in up-scale Chestnut Hill it ran to 10th and Bigler, deep in south Philadelphia. When I saw an ad for a Corgi PCC in PTC colors for Route 23, I HAD to get one!    

+


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(@orangeempire)
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Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 35
04/10/2020 7:47 pm  

This is a realistic industrial street scene!

You perfectly closed the scene, which is essential- the building next to the street and the bridge that spans over the street.

Doing that you don't need too much space- space is the mayor concern of many modelers reflecting about a Layout in O-Scale.

Juerg 

Orange Empire 


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(@nyterm)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
14/10/2020 6:58 pm  

Plasticville, anyone?   HAAARRRUmmph!  Not to scale. Toy like.  Cheap PLASTIC.  Intended for the toy train trade.   Yep: All of that and more! 

However, it CAN have a place on scale model railroads. Often it only takes a different paint job to make a Plasticville item look better in a scale setting. Some Plasticville structures are truly based on prototype structures. The switch tower is one, it's based on a 1906 B&O design! Even the Plasticville depot, a typical "Lionel" size structure, can get a new 'scale-ized' life with a few modifications and added details. Even the little diner can fit in, appropriately re-done to mimic one of the small, stainless steel burger-joint jobs that came out in the 1940's. Then too, a believable setting for all this helps a great deal for them to fit in. This is an overview of Rossiter Junction on the Baltimore & New York Railway. It's named for my good friend and 'mate' Neville Rossiter of Perth West Australia, who is a well know O scale modeler. The two tracks on the right are the main line. The right most track leads to the top of the photo for Edgewater, the main yard. The track to the left is the west bound main. It leads farther down, to a large three-track hidden holding /staging loop. The branch track at the station leads up to the small town of Endsville, with a wye and some local freight customers. 

Ed Bommer  


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(@nyterm)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
14/10/2020 7:05 pm  

Forgot to add, that 'notch' in the left side of he benchwork is to access the hand-thrown switch for the Endsville branch, which was built over the three loop holding tracks.

All switches are hand thrown, trains ran with portable, plug-in memory throttles.

Operators followed their trains as they progressed along the layout. 


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(@jordan)
Active Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 6
14/10/2020 10:57 pm  

Someone say Plasticville? Usually to be avoided, but this 'Tenement building' was going very cheap once in a model shop, I bought it & turned it into a small truckstop building, adding a few details such as rain downpipes & a/c fans, and a good repaint, weathering & signs.

It passes muster in a cramped corner of my small (17' x 8') under-construction layout....


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(@nyterm)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
25/10/2020 9:32 pm  

A little more plastic here.  A Susquehanna & Chesapeake plug run from beyond its junction at Endsville on the Baltimore & New York, is on its way to Edgewater station.  The 4-6-0 is a modified AHM/Rivarossi "Casey Jones," tweaked to get closer to a B&O Class B-8 loco of about the same age and size.

It was re-equipped with a larger 'can' motor and a heavier weight in the boiler. An All Nation B&O style pilot is on the front end and a Precision Sale electric headlight is on the smoke box. The cab original clerestory was removed and vent hatches put in its place. The tender rides on Athearn arch-bar trucks fitted with Precision Scale leaf springs. It has foot boards on the end sill. This loco was then able to haul 6 freight cars up a 3% grade. Much better than with the little original 3 pole wound field motor and anemic boiler weight. But care is needed to avoid damaging the drive gears.

The Staten Island coach is a modified MTH  64' "wood side" car, based on a Long Island RR 1900 prototype. It models one of three Coal & Coke coaches built by Pullman in 1910. They were among 50 similar wooden open platform coaches B&O sent to Staten Island in the 1920's to help with ever increasing passenger traffic prior to electrification in 1925. In this fictional case, the S&C was able to get it to replace an even older coach that was no longer serviceable. In the rush to assure service, they didn't even bother to change the name on the letterboard!  Later? 

A study in plastic for you! 

Ed Bommer


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(@nyterm)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 47
26/10/2020 2:32 pm  
Posted by: @nyterm

"fitted with Precision Scale leaf springs."     My error, above. That work was done sometime after the above photo was taken.

Ed Bommer


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