Notifications
Clear all

Upgrading older brass tank cars  

Page 2 / 2

(@orangeempire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 191
Topic starter  

On the line

My tank train moves out of the yard - I like the individuality of each car of the consist in their conformity as tank cars.

I hope this information helps you to go for your own modeling projects - have fun, shure in O-Scale 2 rail!

Orange Empire - Juerg Luetscher


ReplyQuote
(@nyterm)
Estimable Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 154
 

Juerg, that is truly fine work on detailing the underbody of tank cars.

They truly need such detail because it's all open underneath.

Also the paint and weathering are top notch.

Here is a tank car I did with underbody detail.

It's a Walthers built from parts and has a tank made of PVC pipe and has the three piece AB brake system. 

One thing about the plumbing for AB brake systems, is that piping between the reservoir and brake valve should be made as short as possible.

To do that, the reservoir and brake valve are usually set opposite each other under the car and rearward of the brake cylinder, which is located at, or close, to the center of the car.


ReplyQuote
(@orangeempire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 191
Topic starter  

Hy Ed

your observation about the location of the brake-valve on one of my tank cars is absolutly correct.

The reservoir and the brake valve are located in the same sector of the car frame - this is the rule.

When I did the upgrading work on this tank car, I noticed the unusual configuration.

I purchased this car already painted and I did not want to cause additional work by moving the valve to the correct side.

I decided to keep this configuration. 

I wish all the best for 2021 to you Ed, but also to all the members and visitors of this O-Scale site!

Let's have interesting discussions about our great hobby.

Share in the expertise is a key issue!

Juerg


ReplyQuote
(@orangeempire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 191
Topic starter  

Dear Ed,

the photo of your tank car shows light brown colored wheels.

That is typical for new wheelsets - the sides of new wheels are rusty. Wheels are not painted, like couplers also do not have a paint coat.  This is done to keep hidden corrosion away from this critical components, unpainted parts can be inspected to find cracks.

I like this configuration and I did it too on some of my cars.

Juerg


ReplyQuote
(@nyterm)
Estimable Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 154
 

Yes, Juerg,

I hope to replace those plastic wheels with metal wheel sets when I can locate more of them. At least some rust colored paint took away the shiny black plastic look.

Metal wheel sets seem to be getting scarce.

With metal wheel sets, the rims can be polished a little to detail a car that has gone through a retarder in a hump yard. 

To slow the cars coming down from a hump, the car retarder squeezes the wheels with a long steel bar that rubs on the rims.

On some cars I've added black oil stains from leaking seals on the car wheels, common on trucks with solid journal bearings having worn seals.

The oil seeps out when a car stands still for long periods of time. 

My hope and wish to you and all as well, for a happy, healthy New Year. 

 


ReplyQuote
(@orangeempire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 191
Topic starter  

Hy Ed,

your B&O box car looks great!

Brake equipment (yes it is visible in O-Scal!), some chalk-signs on the body (In good old days that was the only graphity on cars......).

A little bit of dust from long distance operation (so the model is no longer toy-glossy, but looks prototype like realistic).

For may years I used plastic wheels on most of my freight cars.

Honestly metal wheels were too expensive - most of my freight cars were Intermountain kits - I'm still totally happy with this cars.

But plastic wheels produce a lot of dirt on the rail head when running.

So some years ago I decided to replace the plastic wheels by metal wheels.

When I started my new layout in 2013 I defined the rule to operate only rolling stock with metal wheels ( rule is rule ! )

So every car of my roster undergoes a wheelset replacing process. I have done more than 60 cars.

For this migration I bought a large number of NWSL-wheelsets. I'm usung the 145 tread - I like wheels with a smaller tread, but I do not go so far to use Proto 48. Since my "Orange Empire" shows mainline operation I use code 148 rail.

Well NWSL-wheelsets are no longer produced - as far as I know.

Soon I have to find a new solution.....

Juerg


ReplyQuote
(@orangeempire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 191
Topic starter  

Tank car JLSX #1021

This three dome tank car is equipped with new wheels - they are light brown coloured (rusty)

Juerg


ReplyQuote
(@orangeempire)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 191
Topic starter  

What makes a realistic tank train?

The manufacurer of models offer a variety of tank care in bright colours (orange, yellow, green, red...).

I decided to use only black or silver/gray tank cars in my train - this gives an uniformity of the consist.
A few of my cars have a large company-lettering, most of my cars have only the technical data applied.
The variation comes along with different weathering levels, weathering also takes the shine.

I want to achieve a certain monotony on my train - it helps to create a realistic impression.
On freight trains of the forties and fifties brown, black, grey dominated.
And another remark - the postwar period did not know graffiti on freight cars..... 

Juerg


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share: