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(@nyterm)
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20/11/2020 8:03 pm  

What about that steel floor?   It needs to be shortened as well. Also, keep the very end of that cut off  piece intact, as it has holes in it for mounting couplers and the car end.  The car body rode about 1/8" too high for running with scale cars. So the domed MTH bolster plates seen here were removed and flat brass plates replaced them. This car was likely a 3 rail car which the owner had two-railed by changing the wheel sets.  


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(@nyterm)
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20/11/2020 8:53 pm  

The floor has been shortened, both ends are OK for attaching couplers and the car ends.  The domed MTH truck mounting plates have been replaced by flat brass plates, brining the riding height down to a proper level for 2 rail scale. 


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(@nyterm)
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20/11/2020 9:00 pm  

The car had nominal interior detail, which was re-used and enhanced a little with some paint. The car has a ceiling with LED lights which also had to be shortened, making sure that the end where the wires from the trucks plug in are on the correct end.  Flat black roof paint definitely sets it off as a New York Central car. In regular service, NYC passenger cars had their sides washes, but not the car roofs. They gathered diesel exhaust soot - especially head end cars nearest the motive power, dirt, road dust and other matter.  Now for final assembly! 


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(@orangeempire)
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Posts: 113
20/11/2020 9:01 pm  

Hello Ed

your technique to cut a vehicle body is exactly the same I'm using.

The most demanding task is to keep the cutting line in the correct angle.

I also mark the cutting line with scotch band - so I can control the correct dimension on both sides of the body shell.

I try to work slowly to keep the line!

As I can verify it from your foto you did a very good job

Regards Juerg


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(@nyterm)
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20/11/2020 9:03 pm  

Here is our surgery patient, ready to get back to its owner.  The 'chop job' is done, the car is now a scale 67' long. A tad longer than the owner initially desired, but was very satisfied with this result.   


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(@orangeempire)
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20/11/2020 9:26 pm  

Dear Ed

you mentioned to check the high of the car.

This is crucial for the prototypical look of the finished model.

Many models have too high bolsters to allow the trucks to freely move.

Three-Rail models need more space.

While changing the vehicle to two-rail the bolster configuration has to be checked.

It is amazing how this improves the overal impression of the model.

Ed - very good kitbashing job you did!

Juerg


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(@nyterm)
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21/11/2020 5:40 pm  

Thank you for mentioning that Juerg.  Here is the height difference with that Budd car on its MTH 3 rail bolsters and a 2 rail light-weight car.  Wirth some careful measuring, I found that if the domed MTH bolster plate was changed for a flat plate, the car would stand at the correct 2 rail height.   Had the owner had been able to purchase a 2 rail MTH car (they were made as well), it likely would have had flat bolster plates like the ones I made.  


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(@orangeempire)
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21/11/2020 8:16 pm  

Hy Ed

exactly - your picture perfectly ilustrates my statement!

The most important aspect of model-building is to create a model that represents the characteristic of the prototype.
That means fulfilling the important dimensions, showing the typical proportion of the prototype.

This is the reason I like the vintage japanese brass models from KTM - they are perfect in proportion.
The missing details on older models can be easily added.

That is the challenge of modeling - and the satisfaction of modeling (shure in O-Scale 2rail)!

Juerg


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(@nyterm)
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22/11/2020 3:29 pm  

Kasiner by 1949 offered a run of O 'gauge' streamline car kits as 60' "shorties.'  Among them was a 60' baggage car. Their line of full length cars did not offer a full baggage, so this was one that some O scalers built for 2 rail use.  I built this model when I was a teenager, using MHP neoprene diaphragms which were on the market then. It rides on it's Kasiner trucks, which were made by Lobaugh in bronze and then by General Models/All Nation in zamak.  I added the corner skirting and car steps by the 1970's.  It is painted and lettered for a model railroad.  


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(@nyterm)
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22/11/2020 3:44 pm  

As you can see in the above photo, I also put rivet detail on the Kasiner sheet aluminum car ends. It was done with a pounce wheel and straight edge. A few years ago, I had the opportunity to sell this baggage car. The buyer asked me what roads had short, streamline baggage cars.   Both Santa Fe and Rock island had a few, but they were 70' cars. So he asked if it could be refinished as a Santa Fe car without too much trouble.  I 'rekitted' the R&N baggage car, removed the 6 roof vents and put in 8 after filling the holes the 6 vents had occupied with automotive body putty.  The baggage car doors had their four windows made into two windows each, better matching the photo of a Santa Fe 70' baggage car I had. Car side fluting was ground off around the doors and at the car ends. Thin sheet aluminum cut from soda pop cans was cleaned to remove all coatings and glued in place for scuff panels.  The roof was airbrushed with two coats of Floquil Platinum Mist and a light topping of Testor's Gloss Coat. An old Champion decal Santa Fe set from the 1970's finished the lettering job. So here is that Kasiner 'shortie' baggage car from 1949 in its new look.    


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(@orangeempire)
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22/11/2020 6:02 pm  

Hy Ed

Great to see a Santa Fe streamlined car!

You did a great job by punching the rivets at the end sections.

Personally I always had troubles with propre spaces between punched rivets - the eye is very critical.....

Now I'm using the rivet-decals, that are available in different dimensions.
I did that at the Santa Fe turntable as recently described.

Keep on scratch-building - it is fun - especially in O-Scale 2-Rail, the realistic scale!

Juerg


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(@nyterm)
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25/11/2020 5:35 pm  

One of the easiest cast aluminum freight car kits to build is a flatcar.   Walthers and All Nation continued selling aluminum kits while they were in business that originated with Megow, MiLoco and Scale Craft from the 1930's.   There was a straight side flat, a 'fish-belly' side flat and two depressed center flat cars - one for four wheel trucks, the other for 6 wheel trucks.  Basically these flat car kits have a large castings to which one adds details, trucks and couplers. 

Here is how I built a Walthers depressed center kit, which models a depressed center car riding on a pair of Buckeye 6 wheel trucks.  In 2 rail, its important that at least the couplers are insulated form the car body, to avoid possible short-circuits when coupled to another all metal car.   Modern Delrin couplers work fine for this. All metal couplers of the past were much more difficult to isolate.  In the 1920's though, it as not that much of a problem because most O scale was run with using outside third rails for power. 

On this Walthers car, the trucks as well as the couplers are insulated form the car body, as we shall see.  

The place for the couplers on the casting was milled out with a burr to fit a Kadee box. To get the coupler to be the correct height, a 1/8" thick wood shim was installed after getting the trucks mounted. For that, a Walthers king pin set was used, milling out the casting king pin holes for the kingpin head to be set in epoxy, with no metal-to-metal contact. The riding height for the built-up Precision Scale Buckeye trucks was determined by using washers as shims, until there was enough clearance for the truck to not touch the car body on turns. That thickness was then replaced with a pair of wood shims.

Of course, that's an extra step.  The usual practice for trucks on an all metal car in 2 rail, is to have all the insulated wheels on the same side, which was also done on this car.  


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(@nyterm)
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25/11/2020 6:18 pm  

One thing I forgot to add was that this aluminum casting had a slight warp to it. Careful checking with machinist's squares and a level showed it was very slightly twisted and was a bit 'hogged'.  That is, the ends of the casting drooped down a bit at the ends and were not level with the center deck.  Since the trucks fit under it snugly, its important that the body be in its best alignment.  Wood blocking and a bench vise was used. Care is needed not to try to bend the casting too fast or too far, as cast aluminum can be brittle.  The twist was taken out first, holding one end in the vise and twisting by hand, and checking progress each time until it was even with the other end. The hogging was eased out in the same manner with gentle persuasion until all top surfaces were level with each other. No hammers or wrenches were used as they can damage the casting.

The car's end sills were separate castings which I epoxied into place as well as using the screws supplied. The corner steps with angled brackets were built up in brass strip. Brass rod grab irons and uncoupling rods were installed.  Holes were drilled through the depressed center end brackets for load tie downs. The brake wheels and staffs were put on last along with the brake hoses. Kadee metal couplers in plastic coupler boxes were used.


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(@nyterm)
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Posts: 129
25/11/2020 6:25 pm  

The Precision Scale Buckeye Trucks were an E-bay find, already built up. An excellent job was done in building them, but the are soldered together. They roll effortlessly. I used Waltehrs king pins to mount them. That also uses a short spring, washer and wire clip to hold them on the king pins.  These trucks have outboard brake shoes, making them longer. They are almost even with the end sill, to allow for swing on the back side so they do not touch the body on curves.   


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(@nyterm)
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25/11/2020 6:29 pm  

With that done, painting and lettering are all that remain.  Since the trucks are soldered together, the wheels need masking and later cleaning. I usually take the wheels out of trucks being painted. But in this case it would mean disassembling the trucks to do so. 


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